Doctorate Physical Therapy Category

19
Oct

This post was written by American Traveler Staffing Professionals

Related entries: Healthcare Industry Trends ; Nurse Career ; Nurse Certifications ; Nursing Career ; Registered Nurse ; Travel Nursing ;
Tags: AMA ; American Association of Colleges of Nursing ; American Medical Association ; corporate nurse careers ; DNP ; doctorate of nursing practice ; Doctorate Physical Therapy ; DPT ; healthcare staffing firm ; Journal of Clinical Nursing ; MDs ; New York Times ; nurses are called doctors ; Physical Therapist ; physical therapists achieve a doctorate ; registered nurses ; Richard Hader ; When the Nurse Wants to Be Called Doctor ;

As more nurses and physical therapists achieve a doctorate, median salaries climb to $90,000 a year In a recent New York Times article entitled: “When the Nurse Wants to Be Called ‘Doctor’ " author Gardiner Harris emphasizes the modern day struggle that exists over the growing number of registered nurses achieving a doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) degree and introducing themselves in a clinical setting as 'Doctor.' In the article, Dr. Roland Goertz, Chairman of the American Academy of Family Physicians, said nurses who do this can confuse patients. It’s a misuse of the term, he said. President of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Dr. Kathleen Potempa, doesn’t see it that way. She told Harris the nursing doctorate is about staying current and advancing in the practice, not competing with MDs. “Professionals who achieve that academic level of education are entitled to be called doctor,” said Deborah Bacurin RN, Clinical Coordinator for American Traveler, a leading healthcare staffing firm. “With advancements in healthcare education and a system growing in complexity, we will see this issue either dissolve or be resolved.  Nurses are all about delivering safe and effective patient care.” Richard Hader, PhD and Chief Nursing Officer [+]