American Association of Colleges of Nursing Category

11
Jun

This post was written by American Traveler Staffing Professionals

Related entries: Healthcare employers ; Healthcare Industry Trends ; Healthcare Jobs ; Hospitals ; Nurse Career ; Nurses ; Nursing Career ; Registered Nurse ;
Tags: AACN ; American Association of Colleges of Nursing ; healthcare reform ; Healthcare System ; Medicaid ; Medicare ; National Institute of Nursing Research ; Nurse jobs ; Nursing Career ; nursing shortage ; Registered Nurse ; registered nurses ; Title VIII nursing workforce ; White House Initiatives ;

To meet the needs of the current and projected state of healthcare, The White House has earmarked millions in federal spending to expand the nation's health workforce capacity and distribution of primary care providers. The following are positive outcomes of these White House initiatives, effecting registered nurses all over the country. Continued support and funding for the Title VIII nursing workforce development program Advancement in the nursing sciences through funding of the National Institute of Nursing ResearchWhitehouse innitiatives for nurses A stronger commitment to ensuring all Americans have access to high-quality care, by increasing access to nurse managed health centers as well as primary care health providers Reduction of costs by decreasing the need for more invasive treatment, preventable through early and continuous follow-up care, managed or overseen by care coordinators/navigators; this is a new process and nursing position that is a result of the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”. Promoting the importance of advanced educational degrees in nursing that bolster the R.N.’s role in the country’s evolving healthcare system. Ensure that survey figures released by The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) continue to rise. (According to the AACN, enrollment in all types of professional nursing [+]

29
Apr

This post was written by American Traveler Staffing Professionals

Related entries: Florida ; Healthcare employers ; Healthcare Industry Trends ; Nurse Career ; Nurses ; Nursing Career ; Registered Nurse ; Travel Nurse Job Locations ; Travel Nurse Jobs ;
Tags: American Association of Colleges of Nursing ; BLS statistics ; California nursing jobs ; deb bacurin ; florida nursing jobs ; Job Growth Projections ; New Jersey nursing jobs ; New York Nursing Jobs ; nurse Job Growth Projections ; nurse shortage ; R.N. shortage ; Registered Nurse ; Texas nursing jobs ; travel nurses ; travel nursing staff ;

Registered nurses make up the largest segment of the healthcare workforce, which is why shortage predictions from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)* point to a potential crisis. The BLS is projecting a huge deficit in qualified R.N.s to fill nursing jobs between now and 2025. The reasons for this are attributed, not just to the surge in Baby Boomers seeking medical care, but in the imminent retirement of the nurses treating them.

nursing shortage news

Over the next 20 years, the average age of the R.N. will increase and the size of the nursing workforce plateau, as many nurses retire. The hope for filling these vacant positions is that nurses coming into them have strong clinical backgrounds, in graduate and baccalaureate programs in accredited nursing schools. As it stands now, many American colleges are struggling to expand enrollment in nursing programs, and are getting help in collaborative efforts made by company partnerships, grants, and legislative initiatives focused on hiring more qualified nursing staff—enough to meet the needs of the current population. 30 million plus Americans have been added to insurance roles as healthcare reform takes effect. BLS’ Employment Projections (2010-2020) released in February [+]

19
Oct

This post was written by American Traveler Staffing Professionals

Related entries: Healthcare Industry Trends ; Nurse Career ; Nurse Certifications ; Nursing Career ; Registered Nurse ; Travel Nursing ;
Tags: AMA ; American Association of Colleges of Nursing ; American Medical Association ; corporate nurse careers ; DNP ; doctorate of nursing practice ; Doctorate Physical Therapy ; DPT ; healthcare staffing firm ; Journal of Clinical Nursing ; MDs ; New York Times ; nurses are called doctors ; Physical Therapist ; physical therapists achieve a doctorate ; registered nurses ; Richard Hader ; When the Nurse Wants to Be Called Doctor ;

As more nurses and physical therapists achieve a doctorate, median salaries climb to $90,000 a year In a recent New York Times article entitled: “When the Nurse Wants to Be Called ‘Doctor’ " author Gardiner Harris emphasizes the modern day struggle that exists over the growing number of registered nurses achieving a doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) degree and introducing themselves in a clinical setting as 'Doctor.' In the article, Dr. Roland Goertz, Chairman of the American Academy of Family Physicians, said nurses who do this can confuse patients. It’s a misuse of the term, he said. President of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Dr. Kathleen Potempa, doesn’t see it that way. She told Harris the nursing doctorate is about staying current and advancing in the practice, not competing with MDs. “Professionals who achieve that academic level of education are entitled to be called doctor,” said Deborah Bacurin RN, Clinical Coordinator for American Traveler, a leading healthcare staffing firm. “With advancements in healthcare education and a system growing in complexity, we will see this issue either dissolve or be resolved.  Nurses are all about delivering safe and effective patient care.” Richard Hader, PhD and Chief Nursing Officer [+]